It’s Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week Logo from American Library Association.  "Censorship is a deadend.  Find your freedom to read."Banned Books Week is September 27th through October 3rd.  It is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and spotlights current and historical attempts to censor books in libraries and schools. It brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.  Every year the Office for Intellectual Freedom, a part of the American Library Association, compiles a list of the 10 most challenged books of the that year.  The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 377 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2019. Of the 566 books that were targeted, here are the most challenged, along with the reasons cited for censoring the books:

  1. George by Alex Gino DB82273
  2. Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin  DB78523
  3. A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss, illustrated by EG Keller print/braille book
  4. Sex is a Funny Word by Cory Silverberg, illustrated by Fiona Smyth
  5. Prince & Knight by Daniel Haack, illustrated by Stevie Lewis
  6. I Am Jazz by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas  DB85028 and print/braille book
  7. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood DB24695 and BR11911
  8. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
  9. Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling 7 books in the series, in all formats
  10. And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson illustrated by Henry Cole DB92109 and print/braille book

For more information visit bannedbooksweek.org and ala.org/advocacy/bbooks

Banned Books Week

bbw16-question-bubbleWhich banned book character would you want to have lunch with?

Banned Books Week, September 25th – October 1st, brings together the entire book community—libraries, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types —in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider controversial and unpopular.  First observed in 1982, Banned Books Week reminds Americans not to take the freedom to read for granted.

 

Banned Books Week – September 25 – October 1st

bbw16-bubble-2If you could go back in time, which book would you give your younger self?

Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community—libraries, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types —in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas.  First observed in 1982, Banned Books Week reminds Americans not to take the freedom to read for granted.

 

Celebrate your  freedom to read during Banned Books Week, September 25 –  October 1

bbw16-largeThis very month, U.S. libraries of all types and sizes, in cities and towns, will acknowledge Banned Books Week September 25—October 1.  Sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA), Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and highlighting the value of open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community—libraries, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types —in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider controversial and unpopular.  First observed in 1982, Banned Books Week reminds Americans not to take the freedom to read for granted.  This year’s Banned Books Week slogan is “Stand Up For Your Right To Read.”

The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) compiles lists of challenged books as reported in the media and submitted by librarians and teachers across the country.

The top ten most challenged books of 2015 include:

  1. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
  2. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James
  3. I Am Jazz, by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings
  4. Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out, by Susan Kuklin
  5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon
  6. The Holy Bible
  7. Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel
  8. Habibi, by Craig Thompson
  9. Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, by Jeanette Winter
  10. Two Boys Kissing, by David Levithan

Below is a list of banned and/or challenged Books from the Radcliffe Publishing Course Top 100 Novels of the 20th Century.  Here are the top the top 15 classics from the list, more can be found here http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

Challenged Classics

  • The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Catcher in the Rye, by JD Salinger
  • The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  • The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
  • Ulysses, by James Joyce
  • Beloved, by Toni Morrison
  • 1984, by George Orwell
  • Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
  • Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
  • Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
  • Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
  • Animal Farm, by George Orwell
  • The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
  • As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner